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Chinese products devalue UK plywood market
Asia Observatory

20 December 2006

Chinese products devalue UK plywood market

Plywood was in short supply in the UK, except Chinese plywood which was undergoing a temporary oversupply in the market, according to TTJ. Reports suggested Chinese plywood (mainly poplar) was being offered at below replacement costs, partly due to the presence of many suppliers. Chinese producers continued to increase their share of the UK market in the first eight months of this year, according to timbertrends.
UK plywood imports from China jumped 52% to 165,200 m3 in the period, those from Malaysia rose 12% to 111,500 m3, while those from Brazil and Indonesia fell drastically.
Plywood imports from Brazil dropped 14.5% to 85,900 m3 while those from Indonesia more than halved to 27,500 m3. Some traders said that the over-supply of Chinese plywood was devaluing the market. Experts agreed that the tide of Chinese hardwood plywood exports was unlikely to ebb in the near to medium term. Driven by the general short supply, Chinese plywood benefited from a slight improvement in prices recently. Despite these price increases, prices for the Malaysian and Brazilian materials were around 40% and 20% higher, respectively. Plywood Panels 8x4, CIF Brazilian WBP BB/CC 6mm Indonesian WBP BB/B 6mm MDF Eire, BS1142 12mm US$ per m3 630 600-620 Pounds per 10m2 48 Report from the Netherlands Dutch timber trade closes business with price hikes Some traders said that the over-supply of Chinese plywood was devaluing the market. Experts agreed that the tide of Chinese hardwood plywood exports was unlikely to ebb in the near to medium term. Driven by the general short supply, Chinese plywood benefited from a slight improvement in prices recently. Despite these price increases, prices for the Malaysian and Brazilian materials were around 40% and 20% higher, respectively.


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